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Home » Media Watch » Conferences » CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

Abstract

Keywords: Human-computer interaction, physician-patient communication.
Citation: Musgrove-Chávez M. CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. J Participat Med. 2011 Jul 25; 3:e34.
Published: July 25, 2011.
Competing Interests: The author is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and its Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction.
 

Conference title: CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

Sponsorship: The conference was organized by the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI). A full list of sponsors can be found at http://chi2011.org/sponsors/sponsors.html.

Location and date: Vancouver, BC, May 7-12, 2011.

Intended audience: Researchers and professionals in design, technology, and social sciences.

Why would someone interested in participatory medicine want to know about this? This year, health was a featured community in the conference with a variety of panels, special interest groups, and paper sessions. Several papers in particular stood out as being relevant to participatory medicine.

Lauren Wilcox, a computer science graduate student at Columbia University presented a talk on “Characterizing Patient-Friendly Micro-Explanations of Medical Events,” based on work sponsored by Microsoft Research. Basically she and her colleagues found that when patients looked up information, many times it was scary, long, and hard to understand, so the researchers experimented with concise and personalized “micro-explanations” so that the patient could better understand the procedure or condition.[1]

Tao Ni, a graduate student from Virginia Tech, also presented a Microsoft Research sponsored project dealing with explaining medical information to patients. Ni developed a prototype for a handheld augmented-reality device that would project medical images directly onto the body. An example of use they gave was a physical therapy encounter where the doctor could point to the projected illustration on the surface of the patient’s knee to explain the extent of the injury.[2]

Finally, Katie Kuksenok, a graduate student from U-Washington, presented research done with her mentor, Dr. Jennifer Mankoff from Carnegie Mellon, on how online information and conflicting information affected patients’ explanatory models, identity, and actions for their illness. Their focus on the Lyme disease community was a fascinating choice given the amount of controversy as well as differences between doctor and patient models.[3]

References

  1. Wilcox L, Morris D, Tan D, Gatewood J, and Horvitz E. Characterizing patient-friendly “micro-explanations” of medical events. In: CHI ’11 Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York: ACM; 2011: 29-32. Available at: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1978948; video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLK537AqU4U. Accessed June 19, 2011.
  2. Ni T, Karlson, AK, Wigdor D. AnatOnMe: facilitating doctor-patient communication using a projection-based handheld device. In: CHI ’11 Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York: ACM; 2011: 3333-3342. Available at: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1979437; video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zg8RvXe2qTE. Accessed June 19, 2011.
  3. Mankoff J, Kuksenok K, Kiesler S, Rode JA, and Waldman K. Competing online viewpoints and models of chronic illness. In: CHI ’11 Proceedings of the 2011 Cnnual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. New York: ACM; 2011: 589-598. Available at: http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1978942.1979027. Accessed June 19, 2011.

Copyright: © 2011 Marcela Musgrove-Chávez. Published here under license by The Journal of Participatory Medicine. Copyright for this article is retained by the author, with first publication rights granted to the Journal of Participatory Medicine. All journal content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. By virtue of their appearance in this open-access journal, articles are free to use, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings.

 

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