The Pew Hispanic Center and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released a report today that is required reading for anyone interested in a more nuanced picture of the e-patient population: “Hispanics and Health Care in the United States: Access, Information and Knowledge.”


This report is a comprehensive look at the Hispanic health care market (key words: diabetes, uninsured vs. insured, reasons for poor treatment, getting care outside the U.S., folk healing, usual health care provider…) but I honed in on Figure 8: Latinos’ Sources of Health Information on p. 27.

The survey question was, “How much information about health and health care did you get over the past year from a doctor or other medical professional, family or friends, the radio, the Internet, television, a church or community organization, newspaper or magazine?”

Not surprisingly, Latinos are less likely to be online and therefore less likely than the general population to cite the internet as a source of information: 35% of Latino adults say they got health information from the internet in the past year (compared to two-thirds of all adults). Anyone who is trying to serve this market should study the results of the survey to find out where else Latinos are looking for health advice.

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