[Reminder: The place to register an official comment to the government is this page on Regulations.gov.]

SPM member Brian Ahier is Health IT Evangelist at Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles, Oregon. Today he posted this on Google+; reposted here with permission: (emphasis added)

First, I want to say that I am strongly opposed to the AHA’s misguided opinion on 42 CFR § 495.6(d)(12)(i) and (ii); 495.6(j)(10)(i) and (ii) – “Provide patients the ability to view online, download, and transmit their health information within four business days of the information being available to EPs.” I actually view the four business day requirement as a bit weak…

Patients should have real time access to their health information. They should not only be able to view, download, transmit or do anything they want with their record at any time, but have the opportunity to write their own notes as well. Planetree hospitals have been doing this for years! It’s called being patient-centered…

He links to his own post on this – from 2009:

Healthcare, Technology & Government 2.0: Transparency With Patient Data

It includes this, from a book co-authored by Planetree founder Susan Frampton:

“The Planetree philosophy stresses that one of the most valuable learning resources available was the patient’s own medical chart. Patients were encouraged to read their charts daily, ask questions and discuss findings, and participate in the decisions affecting their care. Patients were also encouraged to keep written records of their experiences and observations in Patient Progress Notes, which became a permanent part of their medical chart if they so desired.”

Putting Patients First

by Susan Frampton, Ph.D. and Patrick Charmel

Planetree’s a great organization, if you don’t know them. Check ’em out.

Edit note: the title of this post originally said “Planetree hospitals already do it.” The body of the post was unambiguous about “do it” (real-time access to the record) but the title wasn’t, so after talking with Brian I changed it.

 

 

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